Log Cabin Roofing

Regulations often influence the height of the log cabin as well as the materials you can use. So before you go any further, have a chat with the relevant agencies else you may find yourself demolishing the structure a few months down the line.

Now that you are clear on what’s acceptable and what’s not, you can get cracking on the decision-making process. Have a look at some of the determinants that can influence your design, stability, utility and costs and the reasons why.

In this case, you can go for a flat roof or a pitched one. Weather conditions play a crucial role in this decisions as well as what you find pleasing to the eye.

A pitched roof is any roof with a gradient larger than 10%. The steep of the roof affects how fast rain and snow slough off the roof, thus making steeper roofs more suitable for wet weather conditions. With this kind of a roof, it is less likely that rain and snow can get caught in the roofing materials, resulting in low maintenance costs.

The downside to this kind of roof is that the steeper the gradient, the more expensive the construction becomes. You will incur a lot of expenses on labor and materials and may experience objections from local authorities on the same.

Take caution when constructing such a roof in an area prone to strong winds as they can move under the overhang and lift off the cabin roof. This roof is quite aesthetically pleasing and will be a great addition to your surroundings.

If you have a tight budget, this kind of roof is more suitable when compared to the former option. Not only will you use fewer materials but you can also cut your construction time in half. You can even put up this roof in a day if you wish.

Though often referred to as flat roofs, these kinds of cabin roofs have a slight gradient to them, allowing water and snow to run off smoothly. The extra room you get on top upon installation can come in handy when installing solar panels, putting up a living area or other improvements in the future.

These roofs do have their limitations as they are more prone to water leakages when compared to pitched types. Leakage often occurs in wet regions, hence the need to factor in location when putting up a roof. Flat roofs can also cave in under the pressure of snow weight during winters.

They are also quite unstable when used to roof large sections, and they are more suited to small spaces. All, in all, these roofs are excellent options for small cabins located in dry regions.